“Home Land” Brings the House Down

Sam Lipsyte’s satirical novel Home Land, published in 2004 by Picador, follows anti-hero Lewis “Teabag” Miner, an alum of Eastern Valley High School, who “did not pan out.” Falling short of his fellow former students, among whom are doctors, athletes, and soon-to-be congressmen, Lewis spends his days in the New Jersey suburb where he grew up smoking pot, surfing the Internet for lewd pictures of women in leg warmers, and in general, doing nothing. But Lewis is also living out the dream of many high school misfits—he gets to tell his former classmates exactly what he thinks of them, as the book is written as a series of updates for his alma mater’s Alumni Newsletter, which Lewis knows are never actually published due to their inappropriate, but truthful nature. These updates detail the decrepit wasteland Lewis interprets the world to be, offering a unique perspective from the guy at the very bottom of the food chain in a dog–eat–dog world.

"Home Land" Brings the House Down

Sam Lipsyte’s satirical novel Home Land, published in 2004 by Picador, follows anti-hero Lewis “Teabag” Miner, an alum of Eastern Valley High School, who “did not pan out.” Falling short of his fellow former students, among whom are doctors, athletes, and soon-to-be congressmen, Lewis spends his days in the New Jersey suburb where he grew up smoking pot, surfing the Internet for lewd pictures of women in leg warmers, and in general, doing nothing. But Lewis is also living out the dream of many high school misfits—he gets to tell his former classmates exactly what he thinks of them, as the book is written as a series of updates for his alma mater’s Alumni Newsletter, which Lewis knows are never actually published due to their inappropriate, but truthful nature. These updates detail the decrepit wasteland Lewis interprets the world to be, offering a unique perspective from the guy at the very bottom of the food chain in a dog–eat–dog world.

Review: Bridget Jones’ Diary: Mad About The Boy

Despite high hopes for the latest installment in Helen Fieldings’ Bridget Jones series, the book fell short of expectations. At times confusing, Fieldings’ novel was difficult to get through. While the writing was definitely on par with your typical romantic comedy sort of book, the actual subject matter and timeline rendered the novel wholly unenjoyable.